kanapy:

Kiss Kick Fall in Love

kanapy:

Kiss Kick Fall in Love

(Source: 64px)

afuchan:

Medieval Cart - Shopping Cart Series
Some news: I will be exhibiting at APE 2014 tables #230-231 (Ferrethound) and will be selling new prints. See you soon!

afuchan:

Medieval Cart - Shopping Cart Series

Some news: I will be exhibiting at APE 2014 tables #230-231 (Ferrethound) and will be selling new prints. See you soon!

argentscarf:

GSNK Anthology - The King’s Game, Nozaki-kun by Izumi Tsubaki

Scanned by setorabu (here)

Well, putting it together, it makes a bit more sense now. I guess it’s good enough for a rough translation. 

Also, I kinda hate screentones now… 

awesomedigitalart:

Cannot grab in a hand by hira-geco

awesomedigitalart:

Cannot grab in a hand by hira-geco

ziggy9911 sent: Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

jakewyattriot:

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…image

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

image

Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

image

And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:image

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

image

Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

image

Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

image

Layered, interior spaces:

image

You get the idea.

image

Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

image

Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

image

4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you.

-Jake Wyatt

puffy333:

pokestory:

"Bon après-midi vous des formateurs!

Like every good worker, it’s always a great idea to treat yourself to a small reward every now and then for achieving big milestones in your work! Whether you’ve finished a 10 page essay, completed a fantastic art piece, or even just survived a hectic day at work, these small gifts allow ourselves to stay sane and refreshed so we can tackle the next day with higher spirits!

Any type of reward is often a great treat for yourself! Choosing the rewards can be bit a tricky. As long as you relax and rest up for the next intensive event, any reward is a great one! My reward is always treating myself to the best local desserts in the area! Even if they look a lot like my research…. You know, I might need to pick a different type of reward in the future. For now, I’m just going to slowly enjoy the delectable taste of fairy type- ERRR I-I mean, sweet mega dreams Audino cone!  Yeah! That’s what I meant….”

-Professor Coco

[Link to Pokestory]

(4koma by Queenie Chan

(Can I say all the food/drinks that Queenie’s drawn for these 4koma look really tasty (´▽`ʃƪ))

You’ve noticed….. my secret theme for these!!!!! (It’s food)

And thank you u///u

I finished Professor Layton vs Phoenix Wright and while I feel kind of ambivalent about the ending, all the art in the ending credits was cute, so there’s that.

Read More

pokestory:

"Hello, trainers!

I’m sure all of you understand how easy it is losing yourself in something you love!  However, you must make sure to take care of yourself.  If you guys get sick, you won’t be able to help me with my research!  Ha ha.  Just kidding!  It’s important to eat.

Musa’s bananas?  Well, I’m actually allergic to bananas, but even if I wasn’t, I don’t think I’d want to pluck bananas off of my friend and eat them.  I-I’m sure they taste delicious though, Musa!”

-Professor Coco

[Link to Pokestory]

(4koma by Jamie)

pokestory:

"Hello, trainers!

I may be a professor who focuses on nostalgia, but I’m still pretty young!  I’m on top of all these new fashion trends!  In fact, watching how fashion changes over time is very telling, especially when Hoenn’s very own champion upgrades his look!

My research is about how humans affect Pokemon, but Pokemon affect humans, too!  Steven has such a strong relationship with the Beldum family, you could almost say that he mega-evolved along with it!

Or, maybe Steven is as dense as ever and Wallace just decided to dress him.  I guess we’ll never know!”

-Professor Coco

[Link to Pokestory]

(4koma by David)